98 James Street Suite 306Edison, NJ 08820(732) 548-8600

Dentist Blog

Posts for tag: pediatric dentistry

By Frechtman Family Dental of Edison
February 24, 2017
Category: Oral Health

Good oral hygiene can help your children avoid painful cavities. Edison, NJ, family dentists, Drs. Saul and David Frechtman, of pediatric dentistryFrechtman Family Dental of Edison share a few tips that will help make brushing a positive experience for your child.

Explain why brushing is so important

Your children may know that you expect them to brush their teeth in the morning and evening, but might not understand why brushing is important. If you attempt an in-depth explanation of the dangers of plaque, you'll quickly lose your kids' interest. Instead, use terms that kids can understand.

They may not be impressed by plaque, but when you explain that failing to brush regularly leaves germs on their teeth, they may   understand why you're so insistent that they keep their teeth sparkling clean.

Teeth kids the basics

Teach your kids to hold the brush at a 45-degree angle when they brush and gently move the brush back and forth on one tooth before moving on to the next. Choose soft-bristled kids' size brushes to make brushing a more pleasant experience for your children. Visual aids are always a good choice when teaching children oral hygiene. Buy some plaque disclosing tablets at an Edison drugstore and encourage your child to chew one after brushing. Every spot your child missed will turn red, making it very clear why thorough brushing is so important.

Everything's better with music

Two minutes is the recommended length of time for brushing teeth, but that can seem like an eternity to kids. Make the time pass quickly by playing a little music while your children brush, or buy brushes that not only play a favorite tune but also light up when your kids brush.

Get sneaky

It's a good idea to check up on older children from time to time. Paying a surprise visit to the bathroom can yield surprising information. Occasionally, kids have been known to simply wet their brushes and put them back in the stand when they don't feel like brushing. Your visit can help ensure that they don't become lazy about brushing their teeth.

Good oral hygiene and regular dental exams will help your child avoid cavities. When it's time for your child's next appointment, call Edison, NJ, family dentists, Drs. Saul and David Frechtman, of Frechtman Family Dental of Edison at (732) 548-8600.

By Frechtman Family Dental of Edison
June 09, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: pediatric dentistry   x-rays  
PrudentUseofX-RaysinChildrenProvidesthemostBenefitattheLowestRisk

It’s important for your child’s current and future health that we watch out for tooth decay. Taking x-rays is a critical part of staying one step ahead of this common disease.

But while x-ray imaging is commonplace, we can’t forget it’s still a form of radiation that could be potentially harmful, especially for a child whose tissues are rapidly developing. We must, therefore, carefully weigh the potential benefits against risk.

This concern has given birth to an important principle in the use of x-rays known as ALARA, an acronym for “As Low As Reasonably Achievable.” In basic terms, we want to use the lowest amount of x-ray energy for the shortest period of time to gain the most effectiveness in diagnosing tooth decay and other conditions.

A good example of this principle is a common type of radiograph known as a bitewing. The exposable x-ray film is attached to a plastic devise that looks like a wing; the patient bites down on it to hold it in place while the x-ray exposure takes place. Depending on the number of teeth in a child’s mouth, an appointment usually involves 2 to 4 films, and children are typically spaced at six months apart. Frequency of x-rays depends on your child’s tooth decay risk: lower risk, less need for frequent intervals.

Each bitewing exposes the child to 2 microsieverts, the standard unit for radiation measurement. This amount of radiation is relatively low: by contrast, we’re all exposed to 10 microsieverts of background radiation (natural radiation occurring in the environment) every day or 3,600 microsieverts annually. Even two appointments of four bitewings each year is a fraction of a percent of the background radiation we’re exposed to in the same year.

This conservative use of x-rays is well within safe parameters for children. As x-ray technology continues to advance (as with the development of digital imaging) we anticipate the exposure rate to diminish even more. Prudently used, x-rays remain one of our best tools for ensuring your child’s teeth are healthy and developing normally.

If you would like more information on the use of x-rays with children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “X-Ray Safety for Children.”

By Frechtman Family Dental of Edison
March 03, 2016
Category: Oral Health
ActorDavidRamseyDiscussesBabyBottleToothDecay

Cavities can happen even before a baby has his first piece of candy. This was the difficult lesson actor David Ramsey of the TV shows Arrow and Dexter learned when his son DJ’s teeth were first emerging.

“His first teeth came in weak,” Ramsey recalled in a recent interview. “They had brown spots on them and they were brittle.” Those brown spots, he said, quickly turned into cavi­ties. How did this happen?

Ramsey said DJ’s dentist suspected it had to do with the child’s feedings — not what he was being fed but how. DJ was often nursed to sleep, “so there were pools of breast milk that he could go to sleep with in his mouth,” Ramsey explained.

While breastfeeding offers an infant many health benefits, problems can occur when the natural sugars in breast milk are left in contact with teeth for long periods.  Sugar feeds decay-causing oral bacteria, and these bacteria in turn release tooth-eroding acids. The softer teeth of a young child are particularly vulnerable to these acids; the end result can be tooth decay.

This condition, technically known as “early child caries,” is referred to in laymen’s terms as “baby bottle tooth decay.” However, it can result from nighttime feedings by bottle or breast. The best way to prevent this problem is to avoid nursing babies to sleep at night once they reach the teething stage; a bottle-fed baby should not be allowed to fall asleep with anything but water in their bottle or “sippy cup.”

Here are some other basics of infant dental care that every parent should know:

  • Wipe your baby’s newly emerging teeth with a clean, moist washcloth after feedings.
  • Brush teeth that have completely grown in with a soft-bristled, child-size toothbrush and a smear of fluoride toothpaste no bigger than a grain of rice.
  • Start regular dental checkups by the first birthday.

Fortunately, Ramsey reports that his son is doing very well after an extended period of professional dental treatments and parental vigilance.

“It took a number of months, but his teeth are much, much better,” he said. “Right now we’re still helping him and we’re still really on top of the teeth situation.”

If you would like more information on dental care for babies and toddlers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Age One Dental Visit” and “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children.”

TreatingaBabyToothwithInnerDecaycanbeComplicated-butStillNecessary

Even though a child’s primary (“baby”) teeth eventually give way, it’s still important to treat them if they become decayed. Primary teeth serve as guides for the emerging permanent teeth — if they’re lost prematurely, the permanent tooth may come in misaligned.

If the decay, however, affects the tooth’s inner pulp, it poses complications. A similarly decayed adult tooth would be treated with a root canal in which all the pulp tissue, including nerve fibers and blood vessels, are removed before filling and sealing. Primary teeth, however, are more dependent on these nerves and blood vessels, and conventional filling materials can impede the tooth’s natural loss process. It’s better to use more conservative treatments with primary teeth depending on the degree of decay and how much of the pulp may be affected.

If the decay is near or just at the pulp, it’s possible to use an indirect pulp treatment to remove as much of the softer decay as possible while leaving harder remnants in place: this will help keep the pulp from exposure. This is then followed with an antibacterial agent and a filling to seal the tooth.

If the pulp is partially exposed but doesn’t appear infected, a technique called direct pulp capping could be used to cover or “cap” the exposed pulp with filling material, which creates a protective barrier against decay. If decay in a portion of the pulp is present, a pulpotomy can be performed to remove the infected pulp portion. It’s important with a pulpotomy to minimize the spread of further infection by appropriately dressing the wound and sealing the tooth during and after the procedure.

A pulpectomy to completely remove pulp tissue may be necessary if in the worst case scenario the pulp is completely infected. While this closely resembles a traditional root canal treatment, we must use sealant material that can be absorbed by the body. Using other sealants could inhibit the natural process when the primary tooth’s roots begin to dissolve (resorb) to allow it to eventually give way.

These all may seem like extraordinary efforts to save a tooth with such a short lifespan. But by giving primary teeth a second chance, their permanent successors will have a better chance of future good health.

If you would like more information on treating decay in primary teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment for Children’s Teeth.”

By Frechtman Family Dental of Edison
May 27, 2014
Category: Oral Health
WhatYouCandotoHelpYourChildDevelopaDentalCheckupHabit

Next to brushing and flossing, a regular dental checkup is the single most important thing you can do for a healthy mouth. It’s also one of the best lifetime habits you can instill in your child, a task that’s a lot easier if your child sees visiting the dentist as a normal, even enjoyable part of life. Here are some things you can do to help make that happen.

First, if you’re not in the habit of taking your child for regular dental checkups, the sooner you start the better. We recommend you schedule your child’s first checkup around their first birthday. This will help your child become better accustomed to visiting the dentist, and get both of you on the right track with proper hygiene techniques. And by identifying and treating dental problems early, you may be able to avoid more stress-prone treatments in the future.

Who you see is just as important as making the visit. It’s important to find a practice that strives to create a comfortable, home-like atmosphere for their patients, especially children. Pediatric dentists (and many general dentists) are trained in child behavior and understand the importance of relating to a child first (pleasant chatting and upbeat explanations of what they’re going to do) to put them at ease before beginning examination or treatment.

Perhaps the most important factor in getting your child accustomed to dental care is you — your attitude toward not only visiting the dentist, but caring for your own teeth. Children tend to follow the lead of their parents: if you have developed healthy habits regarding oral hygiene and a nutritious, “tooth-friendly” diet, your children are more likely to follow suit. As for dental visits, if you’re calm and pleasant in the dentist’s office, your child will then see there’s nothing for them to be nervous about.

Going to the dentist at any age shouldn’t be an ordeal. Following these steps will go a long way in making dental visits something your child looks forward to.

If you would like more information on dental treatment for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Taking the Stress Out of Dentistry for Kids.”



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